Tag: Children’s writer

Gratitude

A Year in Review. So much to be thankful for. #amwriting #kidlit #Grateful

2018 Successes

I have found a much needed shot in writing arm through 12 Days for Writers. On this third day of Christmas Julie challenges us to consider the successes we enjoyed in 2018. It’s so much easier to think about the places we fall short….

Tips for Working with Beta Readers

In the spring the very kind local school librarian agreed to organize a group of beta readers for my current work-in-progress. (First tip: volunteer at your local public library or school library to build relationships with librarians and keep your finger on the pulse…

Make A Ripple

On September 12, 2001
I stood before my class
of confused and scared third graders
and lied.

Baby Steps

BIG CHANGES in small steps.
Like the man who bargained
from a red paper clip
to a house.

Confession

I have a confession to make. I broke the cardinal rule of writing a rough draft. I’m ashamed to admit it, but I had to do it. I read my entire MS. I know, I know. Full steam ahead. No looking back. But I…

Documentary Novel vs Historical Fiction

You write about what you already know, right?  But, you also write about things you want learn more about.   Admittedly, after researching this topic I may be more confused than when I started.  Let me see if I can work it out! The easy…

A Key and A Song

With my key in my pants pocket, I head out the door for my last writing time at Highlights. My favorite spot to write is the porch at the lodge, tucked in a blanket, music on, bees buzzing and butterflies lighting on the hyssop….

No Excuses!

My daughter was at volleyball camp  and I had a rare afternoon alone with my son. I offered to go for a bike ride with him and get some ice cream.  He turned that down. Granted, it was raining a little.  Instead, he said…

5 am on duty

Sound the alarm! Sound the alarm! There’s a rumbly monster outside! It’s getting nearer. Stand guard! It’s getting closer. Louder now! It’s coming for us! Ready? Bark Attack! It’s passing us! We’ve got it running for cover! You better keep going you yellow-bellied giantly…

Playing with Tricube Poetry

Phillip Larrea, a poet from California, is credited with creating the poetic form called Tricube. It is deceptively simple. Three stanzas. Three lines per stanza. Three syllables per line. Time to play! First Day Pencils sharp Clothes sorted Haircuts trimmed Dawdling girl excited boy…